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Britain Made To Pay for Brexit Vote

Senior British Government officials have admitted this week that Britain will likely need to pay for access to the EU single market post-Brexit.

Brexit secretary David Davis admitted in the House of Commons on Thursday that major criterion of Brexit was “to get the best access for goods and services to the European Union”, even if it meant paying for access. Davis later added that immigration controls would not be imposed to the detriment of “national and economic interest”.

Later, international Trade Minister Greg Hands suggested that the UK could seek a deal to allow certain sectors of the economy to remain within the EU customs union after Brexit. This would mean these sectors would have to impose tariffs on non-EU products as defined by the EU, and would be unable to enter into bilateral trade deals. Hands stated that this would not be a binary deal affecting the whole UK economy, instead only sectors where it presented a clear benefit to do so.

The reaction from some pro-Brexit parties has been negative, with Tory MP Peter Bone stating that “people would be absolutely outraged” if the UK continued to pay the EU post-Brexit.

Former Tory minister and pro-Leave campaigner Iain Duncan Smith said that diplomacy was the primary aim of Davis’s comments, noting that he was simply not ruling out any future course of action.

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